Warriors’ Draymond Green says 2017 Golden State squad would beat 1998 Chicago Bulls

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The “new media” has something to say. 

Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green, who recently won his fourth NBA championship while also being the star of a very successful podcast, hopped on Twitter on Sunday to join in on the debate era.

Golden State Warriors' Draymond Green stands next to the Larry O'Brien trophy during the NBA championship parade in San Francisco on June 20, 2022.

Golden State Warriors’ Draymond Green stands next to the Larry O’Brien trophy during the NBA championship parade in San Francisco on June 20, 2022. (AP Photo/John Hefti)

Green was watching a game from the 1998 NBA Finals between Michael Jordan’s Chicago Bulls and the Utah Jazz when he proclaimed that the 2017 Warriors would have taken down both teams if their style of play remained the same.

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“I’m watching the ’98 Bulls vs Utah in the Finals… I can’t help but notice our 2017 team would’ve beaten these Bulls by a dub and these Jazz by 40 if they’re going to play these brands of basketball,” Green posted to Twitter. “And that’s why it’s dumb to compare Era’s (sic).”

Debates between eras have been going on for decades, especially as the sports media has turned to debate shows as one of the main sources of entertainment. 

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The 1998 Bulls were the sixth and final championship team of the Jordan era, with Jordan retiring for the second time after the season. The 1998 Bulls finished the regular season 62-20, defeating the New Jersey Nets, Charlotte Hornets and Indiana Pacers in order to reach their third consecutive NBA Finals. 

Michael Jordan holds up six fingers for each Bulls championship as he addresses the crowd at the Petrillo Music Shell at Grant Park, June 16, 1998, in Chicago. A good docuseries has a rhythm that builds over its episodes, and one of the best in recent memory is

Michael Jordan holds up six fingers for each Bulls championship as he addresses the crowd at the Petrillo Music Shell at Grant Park, June 16, 1998, in Chicago. A good docuseries has a rhythm that builds over its episodes, and one of the best in recent memory is “The Last Dance,” about Jordan’s career with the Bulls. (Chuck Berman/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

The 2017 Warriors were arguably the most lethal offensive unit ever assembled, with Kevin Durant joining Golden State in the offseason. Golden State went 67-15 in Durant’s first season in the Bay Area, defeating the Portland Trail Blazers, Utah Jazz and San Antonio Spurs on their way to the finals. 

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The styles played during both runs were vastly different, with the three-point shot being the focal point of today’s NBA. 

The Golden State Warriors pose for a photo with the Bill Russell NBA Finals MVP Award after Game 6 of the 2022 NBA Finals on June 16, 2022, at TD Garden in Boston, Massachusetts.

The Golden State Warriors pose for a photo with the Bill Russell NBA Finals MVP Award after Game 6 of the 2022 NBA Finals on June 16, 2022, at TD Garden in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)

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During the 2016-2017 season, the Warriors averaged 31.5 attempts from beyond the arc, while the 1998 Bulls took just 11.7 per game. In the 1998 NBA Finals, there was not a single game where either the Bulls or the Jazz scored over 100 points. In the 2017 NBA Finals, Golden State never failed to score 100 points and the Cleveland Cavaliers missed the century mark just once during the five-game series.

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